By Serge Kreutz

One could consider any state of mind that is not sheer bliss an imbalance, or a neurological deficiency, or an outright illness.

Nature and evolution have, through natural selection, tricked mankind into being unhappy because unhappy subjects strive harder. So, most people genetically are descendants of unhappy winners.

Sooner or later, genetic engineering and neuroscience will correct nature. Maybe humans in the fourth millennium will be born with a genetic guarantee for a happy life, no matter what the conditions they actually live in will be.

Before that time, neurosurgery may do a good job to correct chronic unhappiness by cutting short the firing lines of some neural circuits. But certainly not by just drilling holes into the brains of unhappy people, as was done with lobotomies in the 1950s.

For now, mankind has at hand just a number of pharmacological solutions. How good people feel depends a great deal on the level of neurotransmitters at nerve synapses. Pharmaceuticals can upscale neurotransmitters, mostly serotonin, and that’s what anti-depression medications are mostly about. The most widely used anti-depression medications are SSRIs, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. They interfere with the degradation of serotonin, thereby assuring that levels of serotonin stay higher than they otherwise would.

Many people could just take some Prozac, and by-and-large, be happier than they are now. But becoming happier would also make them less competitive.

In order to achieve the goal of great sex, a lot of preparatory work needs to be done, and to have it done requires competitiveness. One has to take care of one’s appearance. One has to study social conditions in order to know where they are favorable.

And one has to work on one’s capability to enjoy those moments for which one lives. Erection problems, or the failure to have a satisfying climax, are disturbances, not only to the mood but also to the whole system of values of Kreutz Ideology.

But like happiness itself, sexual desire, erections, and orgasms, too, are matters of engineering. They are mechanical problems of wiring (nerves) and plumbing (blood vessels).

Currently, the only effective method to interfere with the neuromolecular basis not only for happiness but also sexual desire, are pharmaceuticals.

Yohimbe (with the pharmacologically active ingredient yohimbine) is effective, though, unfortunately, it also is very side-effective. It helps somehow with the wiring. Though not a MAO inhibitor, yohimbe does feel as if it elevates dopamine levels. One feels agitated, even though blood pressure is lowered by yohimbine.

Anything that raises dopamine levels is likely to have a positive effect on desire. That’s why practically all medications for Parkinsonism cause increased sexual interest. (Parkinsonism is a pathological depletion of the neurotransmitter dopamine through interference with the dopamine production sites in the brain.)

The main effect of yohimbine is on the plumbing. Yohimbine blocks presynaptic alpha-2-adrenergic receptors, resulting in increased blood flow to the sex organs, and in reduced outflow. Thus better erections can be engineered, and because of the increased pressure in the sex organ, there is also increased pleasure, and the experience of orgasms can be heightened, though this is not guaranteed.

Bromocriptine is a prescription Parkinson medication (Parlodel by Sandoz), which also reduces prolactin levels. It helps in sexual intercourse primarily because it raises desire. In many cases, this will lead to better erections, too, though the effect may not be as pronounced as what is achieved by pharmalogical agents acting directly on the plumbing. But bromocriptine can make for memorable orgasms.

Deprenyl is another prescription Parkinsonism medication, a selective MAOI blocker. I do find that it raises desire but it also leads to some shrinkage, similar to what people experience on amphetamines.

DHEA has been hyped for years. It simply has no effect on sexual parameters.

Gingko Biloba is an herbal product that presumably increases the blood flow to the extremities, including the brain and the sex organs. Hyped but useless for sex.

Arginine is an amino acid and nitric oxide precursor. It has been much touted as an erection booster but one never notices even the slightest effect.

Pfizer’s Blue obviously works.

Scientifical research indicates tongkat ali raises the body’s own testosterone production, and this could have a positive effect on several sexual parameters.