By Serge Kreutz

They say that words are mightier than swords. Which is true. Nazi Germany started with Hitler speeches. And no Islamic terror without extremist preachers.

In the beginning was the word, says John’s gospel. Yes, all religions are constructs of language. Constructs of language have been the root of more violence among humans than any motivation not rooted in language.

Words are mightier than swords. Why then do European democracies have so many gun control laws, and so few speech control laws?

Freedom of speech and freedom of the press, or the media in general, are destructive. They are politically destructive, and counterproductive to personal freedom, especially when media focuses on the sexual conduct of individuals.

Because people are interested in sex more than anything else, anything sexual reported on an individual person will be discussed again and again until it gets blown out of proportion. If there is just a slight media rumor on, for example, a sexual affair of a president, people will be more attracted to this topic then to a president’s economic policy, even though the latter may have much more impact on people’s lives.

Humans are intrinsically envious of the sexual possessions of others. Thus, if a sexual affair of a parliamentarian with a movie star is reported in the media, then this creates resentment towards the parliamentarian among many voters.

To give the media the freedom to report on the sexuality of individuals is an anachronism of the same category as repressive tolerance (tolerance for repressors results in more repression, not in more tolerance).

Humans have sex in privacy and secrecy. And there is a good evolutionary reason in this. Because, as soon as other members of the species see people have sex, or just hear about it, the reaction is jealousy. And this pattern isn’t exclusive to humans but observable in much of the animal kingdom.

A wise government in firm control of a country could do a lot to advance peace and personal freedom by curtailing the media, and banning reporting on the sexual conduct of individual people.