By Serge Kreutz

Drugs and religions are intertwined in multiple ways, to say the least.

Many an analysis on how drugs and religions relate to each other is true. Yet another analysis which looks at drugs a and religions from a different perspective, is also true. The two views may have absolutely nothing in common. As if this were a manifestation of, and proof for, the multiverse.

Animist religions often hold drugs in high esteem, and typically, the medicine man or shaman is the second most powerful person in an animist tribal society, after the chief.

Psychedelic drugs change perceptions, and immerse a user into a world in which he is less in control, making him susceptible to miraculous concepts.

From a different perspective, Karl Marx famously noted that religion is opium for the masses. [1] Marx probably had Christianity in mind, and possibly Christianity’s siblings Islam and Judaism. These three religion make people complacent. Because they hope for the good life after death, they don’t expect much as long as they are actually alive. They can easily be ruled because priests tell them that if they protest against the miserable conditions they are kept in, or against the powers that be, they will endanger the privileges of paradise. [2]

As an illusion, religions can be worse than street drugs. At least, street drugs feel good, here and now. Of course, they are not healthy in the long term. And the happiness they provide is no match for the happiness available through sexual activity. They also are highly illegal in many countries.

But the gratifications of drugs are in the real world. They can make happy.

On the contrary, the redemption of the rewards of major religions is promised for when we have died already. This is a debt that is unlikely to ever be paid. Unfortunately, only when they are dead, people could realize that there is no paradise, and that they were subjected to trickery.

On sergekreutz.org, on the other hand, a religious concept is introduced that teaches to maximize sexual activity in this life, with a belief that this builds karma, or a soul, that transcends human physical existence.

References:

1 Eugen Schoenfeld, Encyclopedia of Religion and Society

2 El Greco, Christian Ideas of Sacrifice